Monday, April 30, 2012

Angle Madness! - Stock Prep from Hell

With Domizilla off probably invading Tokyo, I got a chance to get back to the Angle Madness entertainment center.  I should call it "the diamond cabinet formerly known as the entertainment center" as 'entertainment center' draws up so many uninspired chain furniture store images in my head...

This episode.  hmm.  It is stock selection and preparation, BUT due to all the inclinations, miters, and bevels, almost every aspect of "stock preparation" is affected.  There's nothing normal about the prep work needed on the stock for this cabinet!

While you may not plan on making a diamond-shaped cabinet, I think this episode will help you see some of the additional work needed up front during stock preparation of a project with inclined sides or "coopered" sides of sorts.  There should be some useful take-away (I hope!)

This one was a challenge to record with dual cameras; some of the lighting issues for the overhead cam will be resolved in future episodes, though they aren't too bad now.

If you like how this is going, lemme know in the comments or press the little thumbs-up button... I already have a troll taking care of the thumbs-down for ya :)



18 comments:

  • Jeff said...
     

    Thumbs up from me, Paul. The longer the better as far as I'm concerned. I never would have thought about the line-of-sight issue with the drawer fronts... good thinking and great solution.

  • Peter Durand said...
     

    You are a great teacher. This inspires to me to push myself beyond what I am comfortable with.

    BTW, long episodes are more than OK.

  • Brian said...
     

    Great episode. I don't feel like it was long at all. I'm very excited to see this assembled! I wondered what your white balance was set on with your second camera though.

  • Carl O. said...
     

    Wow! What a tremendous amount of work. I am anxious to see the final result.

  • Jim A. said...
     

    Paul Marcel,

    You could have done these calculations a different way. You could have calculated the volume of each set, picked your angles, then done three partial differential equations on the X, Y and Z axis. That would have done two things:
    1. It would have impressed the hell out of anyone who could possibly not be impressed already.
    2. It would have made you the only engineer in history to actually apply partial differential calculus since we all suffered through that damned class.

    Jim

  • Tim Raleigh said...
     

    Like he said, holy fuck that's a lot of work...well done video.

  • ChrisHasFlair said...
     

    It's all been said. I agree with everything above except what Jim A. said because he's talking over my head :)

    Chris (who thought HE was insane)

  • Paul-Marcel St-Onge said...
     

    These are some fun comments :) ...and for once it's almost even Canadians vs 'mericans!

    So I think the amount of explanation in the video made it sound like more work than it is; true, cutting the sides completely (compound cuts and beveled rips) is tedious and such (next episode!), but what I did in this video doesn't take too long in real time (i.e., without explaining to a camera!).

    I'm making a second one off camera. Tonight at a casual pace, I straight lined and parallel cut 3 more boards, marked and jigsawed 2 then gave up on the third as it seemed to go twist after jointing/planing no matter what. Tomorrow night, I'll get those parts cut out of some of the other stock.

    Thanks for the great comments! Especially Peter's: I try to push myself beyond what I've done because I think I learn better (including how to cuss better at times!) so I'm glad this inspired you to try the same!

  • Renee said...
     

    Thanks Paul, your methods of work are so great to watch. I learn a ton.

  • Qwas said...
     

    I had to come back and watch the video when I had more time but I don't see how you could've made the video smaller or broke it down into smaller segments.

    I liked the longer segment overall.

    Great job explaining all of that. :)

  • Kevros said...
     

    Great videos as usual, really like the overhead camera.
    As others have mentioned, length of video not a problem, still left wanting more!!!
    How big is your shop?
    Kevin

  • NeilC said...
     

    Not only are you pushing the woodworking skills but the dual camera setup is pushing the video skills.

    That was great! Learned a lot, including that I probably will never try this at home!

    Really nice series Paul.

    Neil

  • Anonymous said...
     

    Great job, your work is always inspiring. You definitely stretch the limits of conventional. Makes it very compelling video.

    Cant wait to see how this comes out.

    runnningwood

  • Paul-Marcel St-Onge said...
     

    Thanks for the compliments; glad to see that a long episode works okay from time to time when the content kinda needs it (couldn't imagine following this one split in 2 over 2 weeks!)

    My shop is in the 2-car bay of a 3-car garage, Kevin. The one-car bay is the beer fridge and storage for house things mostly, but I do have the bandsaw in the gap between the two sides (which is why you see such a lovely mess behind me on bandsaw shots :)

    Nice to know you're following along, Runningwood.

    Now to figure out how to get the warmth in the second camera recording... have to monkey with some light settings!

  • ChrisHasFlair said...
     

    "Now to figure out how to get the warmth in the second camera recording..."

    Ha! Where do you live, again?

    Chris

  • Paul-Marcel St-Onge said...
     

    Someone over on YouTube asked about that tape dispenser :) It's a ULine 3" multi-roll dispenser. After a marquetry class, I realized I needed one for the next project; I've since found I love it, especially for all the tape I'm using for assembly in this project. The 3" holds a 1" blue-tape and 2" packing tape. When doing marquetry, I can quickly swap out the packing tape for a 2" blue-tape roll.

  • Anonymous said...
     

    Constructive criticism. You put a great deal of thought and time into this and while you may meet the needs of people willing to spend the time and effort, I am almost certain you are losing a broader audience. If thats okay, great. If not, then you need to seriously edit and pare down your material.

  • Paul-Marcel St-Onge said...
     

    That's a good criticism; usually when editing the video, I think of shorter ways to explain something or parts I want to elide, but can't because a keeper makes a back-reference. Gotta work on that. Thanks for teh input.