Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Lil' Boxes for a Jewelry Box with the JMPv2 - HP6v2 Tour and Profiling

Continuing on with the little boxes for the jewelry box started in part one, in this episode, I'll show you more about the HP6v2 multi-plane and use it to put a cove on the inside edge of the boxes as well as plow the groove to accept the panels.
It's less JMPv2 and more HP6v2, but as long as you have a 'v2', you're stylin'.
Hmm, how many days until Mother's Day?  Good grief...

10 comments:

  • Mark Rhodes said...
     

    Looking good Paul, there's a jig on my Blog under rosewood jewellery box II, that you might find useful for mitres if you have cut components to length by mistake. I realise you are showing how to cut them on that do da cutting bench though, which looks very clean cutting, and I love that plane.

  • Paul-Marcel said...
     

    Thanks, Mark! I'm going to give your jig a look. Fortunately putting the JMP blade right on the corner wasn't very difficult, but still a silly mistake; I have to do one of those at least once (an hour) on projects :)

    The JMP is very clean cutting. I realize the camera doesn't show it well. And this is the general purpose blade; there is one made for smooth cutting.

    That plane is a CT-11 from Bridge City. I got lucky and found it on eBay for less than new (rarely happens with BCTW stuff). Just cuz it's pretty doesn't mean it can sit on a shelf :)

  • Mark Rhodes said...
     

    I checked out the bridge city gear, I've not seen it before, the block plane looks very cool......

  • Paul-Marcel said...
     

    Ah, then you should check out the BCTW blog (in my blogroll). John has a posting yesterday about the CNC manufacturing of the latest block plane.

  • Mark Rhodes said...
     

    Wow, they have some nice gear, the joint-maker gizmo looks sweet.

  • Brian said...
     

    i love bct, i haven't seen anyone with so many before. and i thought i was a tool junkie.

  • Ralph said...
     

    Paul, did you use a replacement MFT top for your workbench, or use one as a model to drill your own top?

    Ralph Boomer

  • Paul-Marcel said...
     

    Hi, Ralph,

    That top I drilled with a 20mm bit from Rockler. I clamped some MDF to my MFT and drilled up from below using the MFT as a drilling guide to make a template that was 3x3 holes big. I clamped that in place on that top and drilled down.

    The problem is that me making the template and then drilling the top, sometimes, I wasn't too 90ยบ... so some holes aren't very good. But, they work with the Festool surface clamps.

    A better option I'll do when I can get a truck and a weekend is to take a ripped sheet of HDF (the stuff the MFT is made of) to a friend of mine who has a CNC machine. Bring along the Festool 20mm router bit and he can plow out a whole new top for me in minutes with the same 96mm spacing of the MFT. I'm thinking Memorial Day weekend. I'll bring him steaks and beer. Nobody can refuse steaks and beer.

    Using real replacement tops for MFTs would be expensive. At around $90 for a 1080 top, that bench would have cost close so $270 and not be that great. If you find a CNC shop in your area, drilling an equivalent top is very easy and fast. You could get a pattern as you like it for not a lot of tool money.

    Thanks for reading!

  • john said...
     

    Paul, I really enjoy your videos. You are very witty and it makes the topic very interesting. I noticed you have a video on shop safety. Are you really wearing just socks in this video? I know we have all don this, but watch those falling chisels!!! Keep up the good work.

  • Paul-Marcel said...
     

    Thanks, John! Yes, I'm caught... many times, I just wear socks in the shop when recording. Not too often when doing work, but I bet it happens :) Fortunately I still have the same reactions I had as a cook: when a knife (or chisel) falls, I jump back and let it land where it will, but not in my foot :)