Monday, July 25, 2011

Sculpted Mahogany Vanity - Dimensioning Drawer Stock

I've been behind on this project for a couple weeks, but making progress.  In this episode, I demonstrate a quick way to remove your existing vanity!  :)  We'll prop up the top on the wall to take some measurements that will determine the sizes (depth) of the drawers taking in account the plumbing obstacles.  Plus it was motivating to see the top hanging off the wall!

We'll resaw and dimension the stock for the drawers and end with a discussion of the whole "wet the board and tent it" technique that I've been using throughout this series.  Some questions came up about it after the sculpting episode so I thought to better explain it here.

While this episode gets a few loose ends in order and prepares the drawer stock for joinery, the actual drawer joinery is the next episode.  That episode will be a set of smaller videos showing a number of ways to dovetail drawers.

Once the drawers are done, the rest should come together pretty quickly!  Well, I hope anyway... :)

13 comments:

  • rmac said...
     

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • Brian said...
     

    Nice video. Classic RR & WE Coyote. Love that. Equally funny "Don't step back." I laughed out loud on that one. We are all excited to see this project turn out.

  • flairwoodworks said...
     

    That was DYNAMITE! Thanks for explaining your wet & tent theory.

  • Vic Hubbard said...
     

    I think the answer to whether there is a scientific reason to why your tenting works is in your explanation of why you do it. Everything always seeks balance. Moisture in construction is a huge issue. It's why correct drainage planes are so extremely essential. By tenting after saturating you are essentially re-drying the wood. The slower that happens the less damage is incurred. It's why a homemade kiln, especially in dry regions such as ours, need to have a humidifier. The wood just dries too fast and tends to move erratically. Great show!!! What a ham!
    Great tunes, Ben!

  • Paul-Marcel said...
     

    So what made it in the video was a really edited version, Vic! I originally explained it using the idea of potentials, like voltages, then figured I'd lose people on it.

    So then I had a version speaking of diffusion, and that didn't seem like a good angle.

    As you said, it seeks balance and the picture was the only way I could think of conveying it without some science nerd explanation (which I'm not!). Your explanation is better.

    Now I didn't know home kilns use a humidifier; never really read about them, but that's interesting and certainly makes a whole lot of sense or at least venting the excess moisture from the wood to maintain a certain humidity in the kiln. Heck, wood in a tent on my bench is basically in a kiln these days...

  • Vic Hubbard said...
     

    It's not necessary in all climates. But, for instance, my sawyer leaves the logs he slabs with bark and whole for a lot longer than a place with higher humidity, simply because the bark and his painted ends helps slow the drying process. It's just too damn dry to do any other way. Still, even though it may be obvious, tenting isn't something I'd thought of. I'll have to incorporate that, as we are in very low humidity, also. Not to your extreme, but still quite dry.

  • James said...
     

    Great video Paul! Thank you for explaining the tent and theory. I CN do it in one of his videos and figured that's where the idea came from. Do you just tent boards that you resaw or do you tent all of your boards?

  • Paul-Marcel said...
     

    Hi, James,

    So CN covers them whenever he's removed a lot of material. He's in a much more humid environment than here (the moon is more humid than here :) For him, just the tent is likely enough.

    For me, I combined the "runs and drips" of water on the surface. Using a nerdy electricity explanation, the drier surfaces have more potential and therefore will absorb the water faster. Once the sides are at equilibrium, the excess surface water no longer has the driving 'potential' to absorb and will just evaporate into humidity, which works for distributing moisture.

    That's the best way I can explain it, but Vic's reply (#4) seems more concise.

    Regardless, even if it is black magic, it works well for me!

    As for which boards, I also do what Charles Neil does: any board that underwent a lot of work: surfacing (planing, sanding, or routing) and resawn boards as well.

    Regular boards that I've already planed and tented overnight don't go back into the tent... I don't have that many garbage bags! Just make certain I lean them against something so they get air on all sides.

    BTW, your blog looks scary! Good luck with the Zombies; do silver chisels work on them?!

  • James said...
     

    Thanks for explanation Paul. Something I will have to think about. In one of Cosman's recent videos he suggest the that put a board on it's side for that same reason. I will have to monitor my boards a little bit better in between shop time and see if they do move on me.I completely forgot that I had that blog. I started over the holiday break but never got back to it because I got busy with the move. Thanks for reminding me I will have too.

  • Mark Rhodes said...
     

    Hey.. no pressure;-)

    I like your tent theory, we would sometimes lay boards cup side down on the machine shop floor which was concrete, to correct the cup.

  • Craig Feuerzeig said...
     

    I bet $5 last night on the nose of a horse called Sculpted Vanity... in your honor. Sadly he got edged out coming down the home stretch. Thought you'd want to know :)

  • Paul-Marcel said...
     

    Awesome, Craig! Likely "Sculpted Vanity" was getting overworked at his day job to keep on time, too! :o) While it didn't pay off, good caul anyway!

  • RONWEN said...
     

    I love your uninstall method Paul -- very fast, no heavy lifting and no running to the garage for a tool that was forgotten. I can't think of any downside to the method...